Inlumino Global

The Crisis in Egypt, and US Influence

Did you know that the US subsidises Egypt’s Army?

It may be other countries besides gives it support too, I do not know, but the American involvement introduces a fascinating dimension to the current turmoil in this beautiful and ancient land. It gives President Obama a degree of influence in the situation but could be disempowering, even humiliating, if the Army ignores his guidance, as is likely; it is a problematical dimension also, particularly if the there is a military coup in Egypt when America is legally banned from assisting such occurrences.

It is unsurprising, therefore, that the President is attempting to calm the situation, and making it clear that he supports no side, only the side of peace and democracy, and it may be he has to withdraw the financial subsidy altogether in order to distance America from what is unconstitutional and certainly awkward.

It is a pity there is such intransigence between the different factions in Egypt: the impasse could have been avoided if President Morsi had listened more to the concerns of the people, and if the tenets of electoral democracy had been honoured. In most “democratic” countries where there was protest on this scale, the elected leader would have stood down to make way for new elections to enable the citizens to decide through their votes: Morsi has refused to do this, and it may be too late for him to do what is honourable.

And so, once again, the Army is waiting to take over in Egypt. Plus ca change……it could, sadly, get very, very messy.

 



One thought on “The Crisis in Egypt, and US Influence

  1. G’day, Claire!

    This action threatened by Egypt’s military is reminiscent to me of what used to happen in Turkey before the ruling AK (Islamic) party started trying high-ranking Turkish military officers for sedition in the past decade or so (because they suspected a coup was being plotted against them): when the civilian government became chaotic (i.e., more volatile than was usually the case), the military would take over the government, run thngs until they felt civilian rule could be restored and then withdraw to barracks, metaphorically speaking.

    This may indeed be the case in Egypt, as the (Islamic fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood) Morsi government appears to be taking Egypt into an Islamist state of affairs, something which is sparking the rioting being witnessed there. Previously, their motives had good reason to be suspect due to their close ties to former president Hosni Mubarak.

    I find it interesting indeed that the Egyptian military may be taking a leaf from the late Mustafa Kemal’s (now more commonly known as Ataturk [father of the Turks]) playbook, as it was he who came up with the concept of the Turkish military becoming the bulwark (until recently) of the modern Turkish Republic: they may feel they are acting in the best interests of Egypt as a whole.

    There is also a certain irony in the Egyptian military’s actions. Consider the possibility of the Egyptian military doing what the Turkish military used to do. Now consider what the Islamic AK party have done in Turkey by neutering the Turkish military and who may, in the process, be getting too big for their breeches.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *